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Tito & Samady are Engaged! (and Nikon D7000 = ISO Awesomeness)

This blog has been moved to joshliba.com/blog, and you are currently viewing an archived post.  To visit the new blog, click here!

Tito & Samady are engaged, and the wedding is coming up fast later this month! There was still time for a brief session out in the lovely Brooklyn Heights, where I’ve always wanted to shoot pictures in the neighborhood and out on the waterfront, looking toward the Manhattan skyline. Hit it just right, after sundown when all the sky turned blue.  Had a great time meeting and shooting these two lovebirds, and definitely looking forward to the wedding soon!

Tito & Samady Blog Post

Photographers may be interested to know that all photos were taken with the new Nikon D7000. This set is shot with all Nikon prime lenses: Mostly Nikkor 85mm f/1.4D, then 50mm f/1.4D, and 35mm f/1.8G.  Some seem to be finding fault with the AF behavior on this camera.  Especially when focusing on bookshelves.  My conclusive test results with this problem are here.

I’m continually blown away with the ISOs that I can get away with on the D7000 body, besting the ISO noise performance of my pro-body D300s.

Anywho, enjoy some photos from this session, and any questions on the D7K can be dropped in the comments. Camera settings for each pic are below to show you what’s possible with this new body (when in the right hands, equipped with very good glass, and a skilled hand at post-production.)

*Settings for the first photo above: Nikon D7000 + 35mm f/1.8G: 1/80 sec at f/2, ISO 1600

(Click on any photo to visit joshliba.com!  Pics are a bit yellow due to JPEG crunching.)

Tito & Samady Blog Post

Nikon D7000 + 85mm f/1.4D: 1/40 sec at f/2, ISO 400

Tito & Samady Blog Post

Nikon D7000 + 85mm f/1.4D: 1/60sec at f/2.5, ISO 640

Tito & Samady Blog Post

Nikon D7000 + 85mm f/1.4D: 1/100 sec at f/1.8, ISO 1000

Tito & Samady Blog Post

Nikon D7000 + 85mm f/1.4D: 1/80 sec at f/1.8, ISO 1000

Tito & Samady Blog Post

Nikon D7000 + 85mm f/1.4D: 1/100 sec at f/2, ISO 1000

Tito & Samady Blog Post

Nikon D7000 + 85mm f/1.4D: 1/100 sec at f/2, ISO 1000

Tito & Samady Blog Post

Nikon D7000 + 85mm f/1.4D: 1/50 sec at f/2, ISO 1000

Tito & Samady Blog Post

Nikon D7000 + 85mm f/1.4D: 1/100 sec at f/1.6, ISO 1000

Tito & Samady Blog Post

Nikon D7000 + 85mm f/1.4D: 1/100 sec at f/1.6, ISO 1000

Tito & Samady Blog Post

Nikon D7000 + 85mm f/1.4D: 1/160 sec at f/1.6, ISO 1000

Tito & Samady Blog Post

Nikon D7000 + 85mm f/1.4D: 1/80 sec at f/1.8, ISO 1000

Tito & Samady Blog Post

Nikon D7000 + 35mm f/1.8G: 1/80 sec at f/2, ISO 1600

Congrats Tito & Samady!

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15 Comments Post a comment
  1. This post has pretty much convinced me to buy the D7000. Do you have to scroll through any menus to change necessary settings, e.g. WB, metering and focus modes? (I want to eventually shoot weddings, but I have to build up my skill first!)
    Awesome pictures, man!

    March 10, 2011
    • It’s pretty close to a full pro body like the D300s, as far as having lots of direct controls, although a bit smaller in size.
      There are dedicated buttons for ISO, Quality, WB, metering, and a toggle switch and button for focus modes. No screen menus required! Very nimble camera.
      I also like the secondary mode wheel under the mode dial, which is a significant change over the D90, allowing quick shooting mode adjustment too.

      Thanks very much!

      March 10, 2011
  2. Shannon mH Erickson #

    Great shots! Love the color and quality.
    Fantastic! 🙂
    This is another reminder for me to get out there and shoot for cryin’ out loud!!
    Between work exhaustion and the weather out here, I’ve been slacking more than I should.
    Ack!

    March 11, 2011
  3. Thanks Shannon!

    Yup, I have to get out shooting more myself. For me personally, I mean. My personal art and projects have taken a dive since portraits and weddings. 😦

    Thanks very much! Let’s shoot!

    March 11, 2011
  4. Josh,
    awesome write up… haven’t dropped by in a while, luving the blog and especially the site. luck w/the wedding gigs!!
    Jay

    March 14, 2011
    • Thanks Jason! It’s been going very well. Hope you’re doing okay too! I’ll be by the site!

      March 14, 2011
  5. ron #

    The settings for the first photo above: Nikon D7000 + 35mm f/1.8G: 1/80 sec at f/2, ISO 1600 is fantastic. I’ve got my new D7000 with 35mm 1.8g and doing some experiments with portrait. Can you share your setting regarding picture control, AF-mode, metering, flash. thanks

    June 18, 2011
    • Hi Ron!
      Thanks for your comment. My settings for portraits are always going to vary depending on the light available and the effect I want to acheive. I primarily leave my camera on evaluative metering, though that doesn’t really apply in the example picture because I’m using the camera in manual mode. Here’s why I chose the settings above:

      F/2- I want defocused lights in the background, and lots of light from my flash. Why not 1.8? I dunno. I leave most of my 1.4 lenses on f/2 to be at a good level of sharpness. Completely wide open will not be as sharp as a half or full stop down.

      1/80- If the lens has no VR, I usually like to shoot at a speed about double the focal length. I may use a slower speed to allow more ambient light to register, which gets me the rich blue sky and golden lights in the example picture. Faster speeds will lower ambient light, and the light will be more flash dominated, rather than a mix of the two.

      1600ISO – I would use a lower iso normally for the cleanest images, but 1) the sun had set, and 2) I was going to bounce an on-camera flash unit 30-40 feet behind me off a white building to light subjects 10 feet in front of me. A higher iso increases flash efficiency.

      Flash: for this particular picture, Flash Exposure Compensation was +1 on TTL. Usually gotta add some power when bouncing. The same effect could be achieved with an off camera flash in a soft box… But would require an assistant to hold it. Which I didn’t have, this session.

      Autofocus: I used spot autofocus on this picture, 3D tracking. I usually leave the camera in this mode. I just place a focus point over their eyes (if it’s a couple, priority is usually always the girl. ;)) sometimes in low light, I’ll switch to manual, though prime lenses focus pretty well under dim lights. A nice feature of the 35mm 1.8G is the af/m mode. To go manual focus at any time, you can just grab the focus ring and twist to override.

      June 18, 2011
  6. Jcam1964 #

    Hey Josh , First off ,Great session ! I just picked up a D7000 and it’s very encouraging to know that I can get images like that from this camera…

    September 28, 2011
    • Late reply! Thanks so much for the comment! I’m sure by now you’ve amassed a great collection of pics with the D7000!

      March 12, 2012
  7. These are absolutely amazing pictures; the sharpness and bokeh on the 85mm lens is just brilliant. Great work Josh!

    March 12, 2012
    • Thanks very much! The 85 1.4D, although now replaced by the new G lens, is still a legendary performer, and is pretty sharp even wide open, and I love using it for any portrait session! The cheaper 85mm 1.8D is also superb, and quite a bit lighter!

      March 12, 2012
  8. ray V #

    Josh,
    Any reason you are not using wide- zoom lens such as the 17-55mm F2.8? Is there a big diferrence in the prime lens and zoom lens? How did you fix the issue on the focusing of D7000? I use D7k and also have problem on the focusing mode. It jumps so much and hard to get right focus.

    September 27, 2013
    • Hi Ray! First, just wanna remind you that this is an archived blog, and the new blog is located at joshliba.com/blog. But I do still monitor comments posted on this blog. And to answer your question, I did have the Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 VC lens while shooting with D7000, but I prefer to use mostly prime lenses for portrait sessions since they offer better sharpness and bokeh shooting (close to) wide open. Also, the focusing issue on D7000 was slight for me, not as bad as I’ve heard reported, but I dealt with it on some lenses by using the AF fine-tune focus function and compensating for back focus with all of my lenses. (Note that it usually just works for prime lenses accurately) Also, just a side note: I found AF performance better with prime lenses. Perhaps due to larger aperture. Have fun! Thanks for your comment.

      September 27, 2013
  9. Nice!!

    November 15, 2013

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